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Contacting College Baseball Coaches

Contacting College Baseball Coaches

Here are just a few things to remember when you are going through the process of contacting college coaches:

When writing a letter to the coaches, always start the letter by saying Dear Coach Burke, not just Dear Coach. This reminds me of spam email or something. You want to show them respect and show them that you wrote to them personally and only (even if that is not the case). By using the coaches last name you are personalizing the letter. A lot of the time if you only write Dear Coach, they might disregard it. I know if I were a college coach I would give it a quick look and if it didn't catch my attention I would throw it away. We don't want that to happen.

If you get those little questionnaires that they sometimes send you, you need to always fill out them out by yourself. This will show the coach that you are independent and can handle college without mom and dad over your (or his) shoulder. Try to use correct spelling, punctuation, and be neat. Think of it as if you were filling out a job application because essentially you are.

If you are interested and have filled out a questionnaire, or even have just sent a letter, you should call the coaches office and make sure it got there. You need to call and not your parents, just like for the questionnaires. This again shows the coaches that you handle all of this by yourself and shows that you are independent and able to handle what is thrown at you (a quality that baseball coaches like on the field).

Don't call the college coaches at home, too late, or too often. All of these are just crazy and reminds me of a stalker. I know you want to show interest, but you can show plenty of interest through the baseball offices during their operating hours. Don't be a crazy person.

You should also not write too much in your letters when sending them to college coaches. They want to know why you would fit into their program, not everything that ever happened to you in your baseball career. Make it short and sweet and try to sell yourself to them.